[ad_1]

Lori Pollock, the New York Police Department’s first female chief of crime control, has quit and filed a gender discrimination lawsuit against Commissioner Dermot Shea, claiming that NYPD policies violate women’s protection rights.

Pollock, who has been with the NYPD since 1987, claims in documents filed in Manhattan Federal Court on Monday that she was forced into retirement last Thursday due to ‘blatant gender-based’ treatment from Shea.

Pollock, 58, says she asked to be considered for promotion as chief of detectives but instead Shea demoted her and made her answer to Chauncey Parker, a civilian who had recently been made deputy commissioner of the Bureau of Community Partnerships.

The request for promotion came after a meeting last year where she spoke about her role as chief of bureau of crime control strategies and in which she claims Shea was distracted and looking at his phone a lot.

Lori Pollock, the New York Police Department's first female chief of crime control, has quit

She filed a gender discrimination lawsuit against Commissioner Dermot Shea, claiming that NYPD policies violate women's protection rights

Lori Pollock, the New York Police Department’s first female chief of crime control, has quit and filed a gender discrimination lawsuit against Commissioner Dermot Shea, claiming that NYPD policies violate women’s protection rights

The lawsuit is filed against Shea on an individual basis and in his role as Commissioner. Pollock argues that as only one of five women to become a three-star chief in the 175 years of the NYPD, she was held back by the apparent 'glass ceiling' at the department

The lawsuit is filed against Shea on an individual basis and in his role as Commissioner. Pollock argues that as only one of five women to become a three-star chief in the 175 years of the NYPD, she was held back by the apparent ‘glass ceiling’ at the department

Pollock explains in the lawsuit that the Chief of Detectives position, currently held by Rodney Harrison, is a natural next step for men who were in her previous position.

Shea – who joined the force in 1990 – held the position from April 2018 until November 2019 before he was sworn in as Commissioner last December.

‘After I replaced him, he moved on to chief of detectives and now he’s the police commissioner,’ Chief Pollock told the New York Times. ‘How is it that the only woman to have served in that capacity was demoted?’ 

She claims she told Parker how she felt about the demotion to chief of collaborative policing, which was previously held by civilian Susan Herman.

‘First I get dumped to this position and then you tell me you are my supervisor and don’t you think that is a kick in the teeth?’ Pollock said on December 9.

The circumstances of Pollock’s departure and legal action was first reported by the New York Daily News.

‘In sum, by this reorganization process, Shea demoted Pollock, a female 3-star chief, to a role subordinate to Parker, a male, civilian whose prior experience and qualifications are unrelated to police operations and management,’ the lawsuit states.

‘Pollock was far more qualified than Parker to lead BCP.’

Pollock says she asked to be considered for promotion as chief of detectives but instead Shea demoted her and made her answer to a civilian in her new role

Pollock says she asked to be considered for promotion as chief of detectives but instead Shea demoted her and made her answer to a civilian in her new role

Pollock asserts in the filing that she was humiliated by Shea who she claims mocked her in front of 30 high-ranking NYPD executives in December when he demoted her, resulting in her losing her place three seats down from him at the table.

'First I get dumped to this position and then you tell me you are my supervisor and don't you think that is a kick in the teeth?' Pollock told Chauncey Parker (pictured), a civilian who had been made deputy commissioner of the Bureau of Community Partnerships on December 9

‘First I get dumped to this position and then you tell me you are my supervisor and don’t you think that is a kick in the teeth?’ Pollock told Chauncey Parker (pictured), a civilian who had been made deputy commissioner of the Bureau of Community Partnerships on December 9

The lawsuit claims Shea yelled at her during the meeting: ‘Hey Lori, how do you like it at the other end of the table?’

‘This remark was disrespectful, disparaging and denigrating by design,’ the lawsuit states. ‘By this remark, Shea also showed his absolute disregard for his adverse treatment of Pollock.’

Documents claim that Shea even admitted in a February meeting that ‘structurally her transfer was wrong.’

Pollock argues that as only one of five women to become a three-star chief in the 175 years of the NYPD, she was held back by the apparent ‘glass ceiling’ at the department.

‘Pollock was forced to retire her police career because of her gender rather than continue to endure no opportunity for advancement and the loss of her staff, authority and management responsibilities,’ the lawsuit claims.

Monday's filing asserts that 'women are less likely than men to advance to higher uniform ranks'

Monday’s filing asserts that ‘women are less likely than men to advance to higher uniform ranks’

Pollock wants a jury trial and for Shea and the city to state they violated the equal protection rights of women

Pollock wants a jury trial and for Shea and the city to state they violated the equal protection rights of women

Pollock explains in the lawsuit that the Chief of Detectives position, currently held by Rodney Harrison (pictured), is a natural next step for men who were in her previous position

Pollock explains in the lawsuit that the Chief of Detectives position, currently held by Rodney Harrison (pictured), is a natural next step for men who were in her previous position 

The lawsuit includes information about an internal analysis that determined the ‘advancement of women within the uniform ranks of the department is not independent of gender.’

Monday’s filing asserts that ‘women are less likely than men to advance to higher uniform ranks.’

Five female cops have reached three-star status by the end of the month they have all resigned, the New York Times reports.

Former chief of community affairs, Joanne Jaffe, stepped down in 2018 and claimed that there are cliques in the NYPD.

Jaffe previously filed a lawsuit against the NYPD with former chief of personnel, Diana Pizzuti.

Pollock was demoted to chief of collaborative policing, which was previously held by civilian Susan Herman (pictured)

Pollock was demoted to chief of collaborative policing, which was previously held by civilian Susan Herman (pictured)

The former chiefs – who are white – also claimed they were booted out to make way for men and minorities.

The department called their claims of gender discrimination ‘baseless.’

Women make up 18 percent of the department’s 36,000 uniformed officers but no women have even been Commissioner.

Nationwide, women make up less than 12 percent of the police force, 10 percent of police supervisors and 3 percent of police executives.

The lawsuit is filed against Shea on an individual basis and in his role as Commissioner.

Atlanta, Philadelphia and Washington are some big cities where women have become Commissioner however the likes of New York City, Los Angeles and Chicago are yet to follow.

Pollock wants a jury trial and for Shea and the city to state they violated the equal protection rights of women.

‘We will review the lawsuit when we are served. The contributions of women, both in leadership roles and in their representation in the uniformed and civilian ranks, across the Police Department, cannot be overestimated,’ an NYPD spokeswoman Detective Sophia Mason told DailyMail.com when approached for comment.

[ad_2]

Source link

Rescuers pull second body from the rubble of Baltimore gas explosion
Meghan Markle got a 'royal masterclass' from the Queen

Leave a Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

By continuing to use the site, you agree to the use of cookies. More information

The cookie settings on this website are set to "allow cookies" to give you the best browsing experience possible. If you continue to use this website without changing your cookie settings or you click "Accept" below then you are consenting to this.

Close